Archive for the ‘Ollie's Field Journal’ Category

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Honours for Ollie

YAY! Thank you to the Book Publishers Association of Alberta. Ollie’s Field Journal won two awards at the Alberta Book Awards:

WINNER!
Children  and  Young Adult Book of the Year

WINNER!
Book Illustration of the Year

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“Ollie’s” Appearances

Events:
• Salon international du livre, Geneva 2008
• Young International Festival of Authors, Toronto,  October 2008

    Publications:
    • Canadian Living (Editor’s Pick!), October 2008
    • Dispatches: MSF Canada, Summer 2008

    Television:
    • The Hour with George Stroumboulopoulos, 10 June 2008

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    Ollie’s Interview with Sheik Conteh, MSF Field Nurse

    We were very lucky to be invited to the Young International Festival of Authors in Toronto.

    Over 200 children participated in our session! Together, we learned more about “Ollie’s” journey and her campaign to Spread the Peanut Paste Prescription. But the highlight of our session was talking to MSF field nurse, Sheik Conteh, who joined in the session from Uganda.

    We are happy to share with you some of the questions the children at the Festival had for Sheik—and his very inspiring answers.

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    Ollie’s Fieldwork at Audrey’s Books

    All the month of June, the original CRENI Photographer’s photos and CRENI Footprints will be in the window of Audrey’s Books in Edmonton (www.audreysbooks.com). Not in Edmonton? Here is a picture of the window display:

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    Kindergartner’s Footprint Mural

    Children in Martensville, Saskatchewan made a “Spread the Peanut Paste Prescription!” mural of their footprints! Thank you kindergartners! You have very colourful feet.

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    Students Help Spread the P.P.P.

    Students in Martensville, Saskatchewan joined Ollie’s campaign to help spread the word about the importance of the Peanut Paste Prescription. They made posters and buttons express their feelings about children and malnutrition. Here is some of their work:

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    “Ollie” in the Uxbridge Public Library

    The Uxbridge Public Library in Uxbridge, Ontario is the first library on the planet to have Ollie’s Field Journal in their collection I hope lots of children in Uxbridge take it out of the library and read it. And send me their reviews: ollie@juniorglobalcitizen.org

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    Guest Blogger

    My first GBer is Isaac. Isaac is in grade 6 and lives in Edmonton. He is a very involved junior global citizen: fundraising for international projects and working to build awareness for international issues. He and his classmates are working to raise $4,000 for World Vision Canada.

    They also did the readers’ theatre video for the JGCC. And Isaac wrote a blog about it.

    Isaac: YOU ROCK!

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    Learn More About Ollie

    Niger

    The most important thing you should know is that in Niger there are wonderful, friendly people. People like art and music and visiting with their friends.

    Most people in Niger are farmers or herdsmen and live rurally (9/10 of people live in the country!). The farmers grow crops like, cassava cowpeas, cotton, millet, rice and sorghum. The herdsmen have goats.There is not much rainfall in Niger (and there has been a 1/4 drop in rainfall since the 1960’s). Much of the North of the country is desert and only 1/10 of the country is good for growing crops

    The main language is French, but Hausa is also spoken.

    It is the poorest country in the world. The average income is less than $1.00 a day.

    Education is quite low. Four out of 10 men and 1 out of 10 women can read and write. Two out of 5 men and 1 out of 5 women have attended primary school.

    The average woman has 7 children. The life expectancy is 44 years

    Niger has bad roads. It is hard to get places.

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    Introducing Ollie’s Field Journal

    Ollie’s mother has gone away to help children in far away Niger, Africa during the “hunger season;” a time when many children are hurt because they don’t have enough food – or enough good, nutritious food – to eat. Ollie’s mother tells her the children are suffering from malnutrition. Ollie is happy her mother can help the children – but when Ollie receives a letter and photos from her mother she becomes inspired!

    She decides she wants to tell the story about the children hurt by the hunger season and how they are being helped.

    She sets out on a journey through 4 countries with her fact-finding equipment, 100 questions and 3 things she really wants to know:

    1. What malnutrition is and why does it happen?
    2. How can children suffering from malnutrition be helped (!)?
    3. Why mothers make the best doctors

    Ollie interviews many people along her journey. And while in Niger, Ollie visits 2 types of hospitals and sees for herself how the children are being helped.

    She is happy to report that the findings from her journey are 9/10ths happy.

    Let’s learn more about Ollie’s journey and what she learned.